All Good Things Must Come To An End

All good things must come to an end blog photoAs Chaucer once said, “All good things must come to an end.”

And while this final installment of bestpracticelife.wordpress.com won’t rank with the finales for M*A*S*H, Mad Men or Breaking Bad with the masses, I know it will remain a memorable moment in my life.

When I began this blog in August, 2014 I did so with two goals:

  1. For one year, provide insight into the best practices that definitively assist in living a more rewarding and fulfilling life to anyone willing to read.
  2. Make a positive impact on at least one person’s life.

Well, it’s been one year and with 72 followers and countless positive comments, I can safely assume that at least one of my posts has been utilized successfully.

So, with my goals achieved, I realize now is the best time to embark on another journey. Considering how often I’ve mentioned the necessity of having a clear end game for any goal you pursue, I’d be a hypocrite if I continued.

With that said, I will leave you with what I believe to be the most important best life practice.

Ask 10 people the key to a successful life and you’ll probably receive 10 different answers. I’ve thought a lot about this idea and truly believe the answer is:

We must have complete control over our future through the decisions we make.” 


Who enjoys life more? The person living in a mansion overlooking the ocean, brand-new sports car in the garage, the latest fashion to wear and a limitless bank account, but whose every move and access to this wealth is determined by a controlling partner.

or

The blue-collar worker, scraping by to pay the rent and hoping his car doesn’t break down each day, but who has the freedom to go where he pleases whenever he wants.

I’ll take the latter every time, because he has the power of decision to change his life for the better at any and every moment.

Without the ability to determine our own lives, we’re merely puppets on a string controlled by outside influences. When we remain masters of our future, all it takes is a definitive decision to chart a new course for our lives. And if the results aren’t want we want, we have the ability to change them at any time.

My course now heads off shore as I begin my goal of earning a sailboat captain’s license. I mentioned at the bottom of every blog that my ultimate life includes working remotely from the deck of my boat as my wife and I cruise the Caribbean. I’m waiting no longer to begin.

Best of luck to all who read this and remember that positive lasting life change can happen in an instant, but only when you’ll no longer accept your current situation.

Make today better than yesterday, but not as great as tomorrow!

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The Source of Our Success

Pride blog photo

With next week’s post being my last here on bestpracticelife.wordpress.com, I wanted to keep this one short and to the point.

For many of us, especially men, pride is extremely important. So much so that we will sometimes forego better judgement to save face. And often to our own regret.

So, today’s next-to-last best life practice is:

“Accept and utilize sound advice, no matter who provides it.”

Remember, our goal is to consistently increase our enjoyment of life by utilizing best practices to their fullest. Therefore, it makes no sense to avoid using them just because of our negative relationship with the person who provided it to us. When we do, we only spite ourselves and unnecessarily delay our success.

So, put away the pride and use your better judgement. In the end, the source doesn’t matter. Only the results do.


Chris Errington is a husband, dad, writer, seeker of truth and fervent believer in the power of utilizing best practices to live a more balanced and enjoyable life. When I’m not rooting for the Steelers and West Virginia University or fretting over the grass in the front/back yards, I’m working my plan to live my ultimate goal – writing remotely from the deck of a 38-foot sloop while sailing throughout the Caribbean. Getting my wife to agree is another matter entirely.

– Follow me at:

Twitter: @Tribunewriter

Facebook: http://www.facebook.com/chris.errington.564

Simplify Your Life

Simplify your life blog photoMost dads love their children – especially those who follow in their footsteps. My son Jake embodies this the most of my three boys.

So, when he took a huge step up in competition this summer and began playing with the high school baseball team just a month after turning 14, I was excited. When he struggled for the first time in his young career, I was concerned. When he became visably frustrated and some of his enjoyment for the game waned, I became his counselor.

We’ve all been there at one time or another.

Despite our best efforts, seemingly all goes against us. Sometimes we work harder, sometimes we quit. Each time, it seems like we’ll never reach our desired objective.

So, just as I would with anyone else, I provided Jake with a best life practice that I’ll share with you today.


“The key to success is often simplifying our lives.”

We can’t always outwork a problem. Adding more resources (our time, energy, finances) isn’t always the quickest way to reach our objective.

Sometimes, less really is more.

So, slow down. Clear your mind. Breathe deeply several times. Take a moment to relax.

And when you’re done, break down the issue into its most basic parts. In essence, return to the actions that have proven successful in the past.

For Jake, it was a matter of remembering to keep his head down, take a short step, generate power through a quick swing and see the ball hit the bat.

For you, it’ll be something just as basic and just as successful. Just as it’s been countless times in the past. In the process, you’ll be amazed at how quickly your frustration will subside and progress will be made – even if it’s only minor at first.

From there, just like Jake – who singled his past at-bat – you’ll be in a much better place mentally and physically to reach your goal.

Make today better than yesterday, but not as great as tomorrow!


Chris Errington is a husband, dad, writer, seeker of truth and fervent believer in the power of utilizing best practices to live a more balanced and enjoyable life. When I’m not rooting for the Steelers and West Virginia University or fretting over the grass in the front/back yards, I’m working my plan to live my ultimate goal – Writing remotely from the deck of a 38-foot sloop while sailing throughout the Caribbean. Getting my wife to agree is another matter entirely.

– Follow me at:

Twitter: @Tribunewriter

Facebook: http://www.facebook.com/chris.errington.564

Finding the Truth in the Florida Keys

Being lucky blog photoSometimes you find the truth by searching for it. Sometimes the truth finds you.

Such was the case when my family and I spent a week in the Florida Keys for a much-needed vacation last month. A sign in front of a Key Colony Beach home simply stated, “If you’re lucky enough to be here. You’re lucky enough.”

It couldn’t have been more correct.

How often do we complain about the most unimportant facets of our daily lives working against us?

  • A red light when we’re driving to work.
  • The copier running out of paper.
  • A child who throws a tantrum because a parent said no to a toy he/she doesn’t really need.

I’ve been guilty of this many times. Our vacation was no exception.

I was frustrated with the traffic that turned a two-hour trip into 4+. I was disappointed over not being able to rent the boat I’d planned to use with my family. I was furious over a mistaken pizza order.

And then I saw the sign.

If you’ve read this blog before, you know I’ll never advocate settling for less than our best. But it’s just as important to realize what we have already to put our lives in perspective.

I was on vacation, in the Florida Keys and being paid despite not being at work. When I look back on it, that should have been more than enough to compensate for any events that didn’t go as planned.

How often can you say the same for your life? How often do you look back and realize what you allowed to interfere with your happiness was so unimportant you now regret your actions? How often do you wish you’d successfully searched for the truth when you needed it most?

For those cases, consider today’s best life practice one of those instances in which the truth found you instead.

Make today better than yesterday, but not as great as tomorrow!


Chris Errington is a husband, dad, writer, seeker of truth and fervent believer in the power of utilizing best practices to live a more balanced and enjoyable life. When I’m not rooting for the Steelers and West Virginia University or fretting over the grass in the front/back yards, I’m working my plan to live my ultimate goal – Writing remotely from the deck of a 38-foot sloop while sailing throughout the Caribbean. Getting my wife to agree is another matter entirely.

– Follow me at:

Tsu: www.tsu.co/Chrissports

Twitter: @Tribunewriter

LinkedIn: www.linkedin.com/pub/chris-errington/6/aa3/553/

Facebook: http://www.facebook.com/chris.errington.564

Enjoy The Moment While You’re In It

Enjoy every moment blog photoJust returned from a week’s vacation in the Florida Keys – my first of longer than four days in 37 years – and wanted to provide a quick best practice I realized on the drive home.

Knowing it would be expensive, my wife and I saved for this trip. One dollar each the first week, two the second and so forth, until we’d saved an equivalency for 52 weeks. Leading to it, we’d say “In just three weeks, we’ll be relaxing in the Keys.” Then, “In just 10 days, we’ll be fishing off the back deck.” Until finally, “Tomorrow morning, we finally get to leave.”

And seemingly, in the blink of an eye, it was time to pack the car and return home.

That’s the case when we put so much stock into a single event.

  • Thanksgiving dinner takes hours to prepare and 45 minutes to eat.
  • Children are so anxious for Christmas that they can barely sleep, yet within an hour all of the presents are opened.
  • Athletes fill themselves with anticipation of a big game, knowing they’ll either be celebrating or suffering in less than three hours.

Today’s best life practice …

“Enjoy the moment while you’re in it”


I’d made our first family trip into such a huge deal that there were times I found it difficult to enjoy. I worried that we only had a few days remaining or whether we’d be able to save for another entire year to vacation somewhere else in 12 months. In short, I didn’t live in the moment. So, too many of them passed me by.

The best part is, the moments we remember best don’t have to be planned. They only need be the ones in which we are fully conscious of our lives.

A child’s giggle. Holding hands with your spouse. Watching the sunset – Each can be remembered long after so much from our daily lives is forgotten.

I suggest we all work hard to remember that, so the best parts of our lives don’t pass us by.

Make today better than yesterday, but not as great as tomorrow!


Chris Errington is a husband, dad, writer, seeker of truth and fervent believer in the power of utilizing best practices to live a more balanced and enjoyable life. When I’m not rooting for the Steelers and West Virginia University or fretting over the grass in the front/back yards, I’m working my plan to live my ultimate goal – Writing remotely from the deck of a 38-foot sloop while sailing throughout the Caribbean. Getting my wife to agree is another matter entirely.

– Follow me at:

Tsu: www.tsu.co/Chrissports

Twitter: @Tribunewriter

LinkedIn: www.linkedin.com/pub/chris-errington/6/aa3/553/

Facebook: http://www.facebook.com/chris.errington.564

Knowing When To Let Go

Baseball blog photoIt’s never easy being a step parent. It can be even more difficult when you’re an athlete and have athletic children who show great promise.

My middle child Jake figuratively eats, sleeps and breathes baseball. Ask him what he wants to do any time of day and invariably it involves the game.

After recently graduating from 8th grade, he became the starting shortstop for one of the high school’s two summer league teams, consisting of kids whom the program is grooming for future varsity playing time.

At his request, I spend a lot of time coaching my son – imparting all of the knowledge I have to help him improve. But, I have this tiny, itsy-bitsy problem when it comes to his games.

I can be a real pain in the ass.

I can be that dad who has difficulty finding the positives in his child’s play. I can be the dad who unnecessarily critiques his child on the ride home. I can be the dad whose wife does her best to shut him up at games.

In short, I can be the dad whose son is too scared to tell him he doesn’t want him around when he’s playing.

Saturday, during a tournament game. I learned my lesson – and today’s best life practice.

“You’re child’s successes and failures are not your successes and failures. Let them just enjoy the game.”

Jake struggled at the plate the first three games, wanting so much to succeed – for me as much as himself – that he was playing far below his ability. And his frustration showed.

So, Saturday I purposefully missed the day’s first game. When I did finally arrive, I shut my mouth.

And watched him hit a double.

I saw the sense of pride in his face. I saw the way he slapped his hands together in excitement. I saw the way he acknowledged my pleasure with his success.

And then I went home and left him alone. I’ll continue to do this until I can fully commit to remaining supportive no matter what his outcome.

According to a report by businessinsider.com, only 1.7% of college and .08% of high school athletes play professionally. So like other dads who struggle in this vein, I’ll miss some of Jake’s playing time. But like other dads, I’m committed to helping him no matter what.

Sometimes that means giving him a hug when he struggles. Sometimes that means making a big deal of his successes.

And sometimes that means just letting go.


Chris Errington is a husband, dad, writer, seeker of truth and fervent believer in the power of utilizing best practices to live a more balanced and enjoyable life. When I’m not rooting for the Steelers and West Virginia University or fretting over the grass in the front/back yards, I’m working my plan to live my ultimate goal – Writing remotely from the deck of a 38-foot sloop while sailing throughout the Caribbean. Getting my wife to agree is another matter entirely.

– Follow me at:

Tsu: www.tsu.co/Chrissports

Twitter: @Tribunewriter

LinkedIn: www.linkedin.com/pub/chris-errington/6/aa3/553/

Facebook: http://www.facebook.com/chris.errington.564

Do You Need A Do-Over?

Starting over blog photoFollowing a night of teeming rain, power outages and a doorbell that mysteriously sounded no less than 10 times, sleep was short-lived last night.

When I cracked three eggs for breakfast – which I’ve done without issue nearly each workday morning for the past several months – I had to spend time fishing out part of one shell from the pan and cleaning egg off the stove when it nearly exploded upon opening.

My wife was already cranky from lack of sleep and I still had another 45-minute commute to my office, so to combat what had clearly been a difficult start to a new day, I didn’t yell or take out my frustration on anyone else.

I just started over.

I told my wife and oldest son, “Ok. This day is beginning again right now.”

I took a deep breath, realized these issues weren’t really that important after all and began anew.

Throughout this blog, we’ve talked about best practices that make lasting, impactful changes in our lives. But too often we believe they only relate to massive, life-altering experiences. Change can happen in an instant, but it doesn’t mean it has to always be a moment we’ll remember forever.

The changes we make can be as simple as taking a new route to work, deciding to change our brand of cereal or waking 10-minutes earlier each day. And when the invariable roadblock occurs and frustration ensues, we can find a better approach and just start over.

I truly believe the most important aspect of anyone’s life is directly controlling our future from the choices we decide to make. Starting over when seemingly all is failing around us is just one of those choices.

Forget frustration, forget quitting. Just like children who declare a “do-over” during games, there’s no limit to how many times we start over, as long as they result in positive movement toward achieving our goals.

In the end, as long as there’s no cheating involved, it’s not important how we reach the summit. It’s just important that we reach it at all.

Make today better than yesterday, but not as great as tomorrow!


Chris Errington is a husband, dad, writer, seeker of truth and fervent believer in the power of utilizing best practices to live a more balanced and enjoyable life. When I’m not rooting for the Steelers and West Virginia University or fretting over the grass in the front/back yards, I’m working my plan to live my ultimate goal – Writing remotely from the deck of a 38-foot sloop while sailing throughout the Caribbean. Getting my wife to agree is another matter entirely.

– Follow me at:

Tsu: www.tsu.co/Chrissports

Twitter: @Tribunewriter

LinkedIn: www.linkedin.com/pub/chris-errington/6/aa3/553/

Facebook: http://www.facebook.com/chris.errington.564

The World Doesn’t Care What You Want

Do it yourself blog photo

Sometimes no background story is needed to highlight a daily best life practice. Today is one of those times.

Though it may sound a bit harsh, the truth is:


“The sooner you realize the world doesn’t care what you want, the better off you’ll be.”

That’s not to say people won’t help you achieve your needs. But, when it comes to your wants, you’re on your own.

  • Want a new car? No one is leaving it in your driveway.
  • Want a better job? No one is calling with your dream employment.
  • Want a better body? No one is lifting weights for you.

What we all must realize is that if we need something to survive, there will often be someone (friends, family, co-workers) there to provide support. But when it comes to our wants, that’s where society nearly always draws the line.

And that’s when we must decide just how much it means to us.

If we want it, we must develop the means to go get it. Far too often, we want the end result without even the semblance of effort to achieve it. In essence, we want to reach the end of the road without taking our first step.

And what we don’t realize is that we’re really only cheating ourselves.

It’s the journey that makes the end result so worth the effort. 

  • What will you cherish more: A car purchased for you or one that you worked hard to buy?
  • Which victory will mean more: The one you achieve with a team you were automatically placed on or the one that you needed to try out for and with which you had to complete grueling practices?
  • What will you be more proud of: The body you gained via liposuction or through dedication in the gym?

Do yourself a favor. Don’t wish. Don’t want. And certainly don’t expect anyone to provide you with any help.

If you want it, go get it. Because that way, no one can ever take away the journey you took to get there or the knowledge that you earned it.

Make today better than yesterday, but not as great as tomorrow!


Chris Errington is a husband, dad, writer, seeker of truth and fervent believer in the power of utilizing best practices to live a more balanced and enjoyable life. When I’m not rooting for the Steelers and West Virginia University or desperately attempting to grow grass in the front/back yards, I’m working my plan to live my ultimate goal – Writing remotely from the deck of a 38-foot sloop while sailing throughout the Caribbean. Getting my wife to agree is another matter entirely.

– Follow me at:

Tsu: www.tsu.co/Chrissports

Twitter: @Tribunewriter

LinkedIn: www.linkedin.com/pub/chris-errington/6/aa3/553/

Facebook: http://www.facebook.com/chris.errington.564

What Are You Doing When Nobody’s Watching?

Working alone toward goal blog photo

My middle son Jake turns 14 today and what I consistently think of first is his drive for the one goal that consumes his life – playing professional baseball.

According to the numbers, it’s an extreme longshot at best. My wife and I know it. Deep down, he knows it, too.

And it never stops him. He takes batting practice until I can no longer throw and is disappointed when we have to finish. He fields grounders until the setting sun makes it almost impossible to see the ball. He plays a game in 90-degree heat, then asks friends if they’ll stick around to practice.

Day after day, he’s working toward his goal – especially when no one’s watching.

And that’s the key.

  • What goal did you set for yourself?
  • Who do you envision yourself being once you reach you’re goal’s end game?
  • What life have you determined to no longer live without?

And now ask yourself if you’re truly committed to its achievement.

  • What are you doing to ensure its success when the excitement of this new endeavor has long since worn off?
  • What are you doing to ensure its success when its completion seems so far away?
  • What are you doing to ensure its success when no one is watching?

Even if you’re committed to succeeding, success isn’t guaranteed. But like I tell my son, each time you work toward your goal, you add one more step toward its completion. And if your goal means you’ll have to beat the competition, it’s one more step you place between you and them.

And when you think about it that way, why would you ever stop working when it gets difficult or when no one is watching? For me, seeing my son working toward his goal every day with no prodding from anyone when others his age spend their time watching television or playing video games, makes my sore arm well worth the effort. And that’s why we’ll be in the batting cage again this afternoon. We won’t be difficult to find, since we’re often the only ones there.

Make today better than yesterday, but not as great as tomorrow!


Chris Errington is a husband, dad, writer, seeker of truth and fervent believer in the power of utilizing best practices to live a more balanced and enjoyable life. When I’m not rooting for the Steelers and West Virginia University or desperately attempting to grow grass in the front/back yards, I’m working my plan to live my ultimate goal – Writing remotely from the deck of a 38-foot sloop while sailing throughout the Caribbean. Getting my wife to agree is another matter entirely.

– Follow me at:

Tsu: www.tsu.co/Chrissports

Twitter: @Tribunewriter

LinkedIn: www.linkedin.com/pub/chris-errington/6/aa3/553/

Facebook: http://www.facebook.com/chris.errington.564

Why It’s Important To Look Out For No. 1

Looking out for No. 1 blog photo

Believe it or not, there’s a lot we can learn from flight attendants.

Anyone who’s taken a plane trip has witnessed the obligatory attendant’s routine of informing patrons of all exits, how to properly buckle our belt and finally, how to wear an oxygen mask in case of emergency.

It’s the final facet of this half-speech/half-mime presentation that I believe mimics our everyday lives best. We’re instructed to wear our own oxygen mask prior to assisting others wear theirs – including the young/infirm.

Unfortunately, not everyone follows this advice in life.

There are those – and I’ve known a few – who consistently place other’s needs before their own. They suffer so others can prosper. They go without so others can have what they need.

I’m not just talking about parents who consistently sacrifice for their children. I’m talking about adults who place friends, family and sometimes complete strangers ahead of themselves, despite their own glaring needs.

This is a recipe for disaster and highlights today’s best life practice.

“We must take care of ourselves before we can effectively assist others.”


If we’re hurting. If we’re struggling. If we’re in denial about our own needs. How can we really help others with theirs?

I believe that our greatest life goal should be to achieve the level of success we desire, then use our knowledge/best life practices to help others achieve theirs. But what so many fail to realize is that to get to that end, we must achieve the first – and that means sometimes being selfish in putting ourselves first.

Without feeling guilty!

There’s nothing wrong with “looking out for No. 1” – especially when we’re bettering ourselves to most effectively assist others better themselves. It’s when we forsake our own needs to focus on others that we fail to reach our full potential and minimize the impact we have on others.

So, before you delve into that fascinating airline magazine or once more unnecessarily allow your cell phone to consume your interest, remember to give the airline attendants a few minutes of your time. You’d be surprised how much you can learn when you least expect it.


Chris Errington is a husband, dad, writer, seeker of truth and fervent believer in the power of utilizing best practices to live a more balanced and enjoyable life. When I’m not rooting for the Steelers and West Virginia University or desperately attempting to grow grass in the front/back yards, I’m working my plan to live my ultimate goal – Writing remotely from the deck of a 38-foot sloop while sailing throughout the Caribbean. Getting my wife to agree is another matter entirely.

– Follow me at:

Tsu: www.tsu.co/Chrissports

Twitter: @Tribunewriter

LinkedIn: www.linkedin.com/pub/chris-errington/6/aa3/553/

Facebook: http://www.facebook.com/chris.errington.564

Make An Excuse To Succeed

Make an excuse to succeed blog photo

Had an opportunity to watch the movie “Lone Survivor” Saturday night and, though I shouldn’t be surprised by its impact considering the importance of the source, I find myself going back to a comment a Navy Seal drill instructor makes to a recruit during the opening scene.

Sure, I know it’s a movie, but I have a strong belief that somewhere, a scene just like this has taken place within this elite unit.

The drill instructor, knowing many recruits have already quit by ringing a centrally placed bell three times and that this particular recruit is nearing his personal breaking point, states:

“Make an excuse to succeed!”


How often do we make excuses to fail? How often do we use the word “try,” knowing it’s worth nothing more than a salve in case we are unsuccessful?

Why not reverse its meaning? No matter our goal, any and all legal means of achievement are open to us. So why not change our vocabulary? Make words mean anything we want/need them to be.

Find a way to complete your goal, no matter what it is. We all know there will be more than enough obsticals to overcome, because the greater the reward, the more difficult the journey to reach it.

So, make an excuse to succeed.  And in the process, take a cue from some of the hardest, most dependable people in the world. You know, the kind for whom failure is never an option.

Make today better than yesterday, but not as great as tomorrow!


Chris Errington is a husband, dad, writer, seeker of truth and fervent believer in the power of utilizing best practices to live a more balanced and enjoyable life. When I’m not rooting for the Steelers and West Virginia University or desperately attempting to grow grass in the front/back yards, I’m working my plan to live my ultimate goal – Writing remotely from the deck of a 32-foot sloop while sailing throughout the Caribbean. Getting my wife to agree is another matter entirely.

– Follow me at:

Tsu: www.tsu.co/Chrissports

Twitter: @Tribunewriter

LinkedIn: www.linkedin.com/pub/chris-errington/6/aa3/553/

Facebook: http://www.facebook.com/chris.errington.564

Know The Score

Know The Score blog photo

As sports fans, when it’s time to make a big decision, I often tell my boys that we must “know the score.”

In other words, know the truth – not what we want the truth to be. Whether we’re winning or losing, the scoreboard doesn’t lie.

However, how often do we finagle our true situations to best fit our needs? We say our lives, “Aren’t so bad.” That we can “manage.” That we’re “doing fine.” When in reality, the scoreboard shows a completely different story.

We’ve talked many times that change happens the instant we determine that we’ll no longer accept our present circumstance. We’ve also discussed how a shift as small as a few degrees will produce incredible life changes down the road.

But sometimes, when the situation is bad enough, the change needs to happen now and needs to be massive. Far too often, it’s also here where we change our scoreboard.

We worry about the unknown that a life change will force us to enter. We worry that we don’t know the correct path to take. We worry that we’ll fail ourselves when our biggest test is taken.

What we really fail to understand is that the moment we begin to alter our lives away from the negative aspects that plague it, we’re already succeeding.

Just like building a city skyscraper, the most important work regarding change comes at the start. From there, difinitive goals, small successes, improved life outlook and the elimination of the unknown (even if it’s only for a small percentage of the road we must travel) all help provide the momentum needed to carry us through the most difficult parts of our journey.

Remember, everyone can see the scoreboard. So, take a good look. Know the score at every moment instead of making it something it isn’t. That way you won’t be lying to the most important person of all – yourself.


Chris Errington is a husband, dad, writer, seeker of truth and fervent believer in the power of utilizing best practices to live a more balanced and enjoyable life. When I’m not rooting for the Steelers and West Virginia University or desperately attempting to grow grass in the front/back yards, I’m working my plan to live my ultimate goal – Writing remotely from the deck of a 32-foot sloop while sailing throughout the Caribbean. Getting my wife to agree is another matter entirely.

– Follow me at:

Tsu: www.tsu.co/Chrissports

Twitter: @Tribunewriter

LinkedIn: www.linkedin.com/pub/chris-errington/6/aa3/553/

Facebook: http://www.facebook.com/chris.errington.564

How An Inch Eventually Becomes A Mile

small changes equal big results blog photo

Let’s wrap a week that highlighted how our lives are products of the decisions we make and how important it is to own our successes and our failures, by partaking in a quick experiment.

Far too often we’re paralyzed by the fear of change – even when we’re certain it will lead to life improvements – because we mistakenly believe massive gains only come from massive change.

This couldn’t be further from the truth and I’ll prove it now.

Ask a friend or loved one to join you in a large open area. Begin by standing shoulder-to-shoulder, but at slightly different outward angles (meaning you’ll slightly be facing away from each other). Take 10 equal-length steps and notice that quite quickly you’ll be headed in different directions. Now take 10 more and notice how the gap between you continuously widens. After 50 steps, it’s a good bet you’ll need to speak loudly to hear each other and after 100, you may have to shout.

Your friend/loved one represents the path you would have travelled had you decided to remain stagnant in a life that was unfulfilling. You represent the new life produced by a slight, yet consistent, change in your approach.

All it takes sometimes is a slight modification to your approach to achieve massive positive results. And the work you put in now pays great dividends in the future.

So, why waste another minute? Because this is the type of change that shouldn’t put fear into anyone.

Make today better than yesterday, but not as great as tomorrow!


Chris Errington is a husband, dad, writer, seeker of truth and fervent believer in the power of utilizing best practices to live a more balanced and enjoyable life. When I’m not rooting for the Steelers and West Virginia University or desperately attempting to grow grass in the front/back yards, I’m working my plan to live my ultimate goal – Writing remotely from the deck of a 32-foot sloop while sailing throughout the Caribbean. Getting my wife to agree is another matter entirely.

– Follow me at:

Tsu: www.tsu.co/Chrissports

Twitter: @Tribunewriter

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Own Your Successes … And Your Failures

Success and failure blog photo

As a sports writer for more than 20 years, the one consistent hypocrisy I’ve found lies not in the sport, but in fans. Far too often, they can be heard associating themselves with the team by stating, “We …”

It’s then that I remind them they are not part of the team. Not because they:

  • Don’t have the same talent as the players
  • Don’t sacrifice their free time by completing grueling practices with the team
  • Don’t have a uniform, number or position

It’s because, I’ve found these same fans can be heard saying “We” when the team is successful and “They” when it is not.

And that brings me back to this week’s theme. In Monday’s blog we discussed how our decisions – great or small – directly impact every avenue of our lives and where we are headed. Today, I want to share with you a quote from renowned motivational speaker Les Brown that accurately expounds on this idea.

“All of us are self-made. But only the successful admit it.”


Think about how easily we take credit for our successes, but blame others or outside factors for our failures. We sooth ourselves by pretending luck or circumstances out of our control play a central part in our future, so we don’t have to take credit. We praise ourselves for the correct choices we make, but just as quickly distance ourselves from our errors.

If you believe in fate, you fall into this category. If you believe in destiny, you fall into this category. If you’re heading through life like a boat with no oars, you fall into this category.

And maybe it’s time you stopped.

The truly successful in life will affirm there is no fate, you aren’t destined to be anything and without oars, you’re sure to head straight for the rapids.

These are the same people who direct their future through the decisions they make. They’re the ones who take credit for their failures just as quickly as they do their successes. They’re the ones who have a clear, compelling goal and work tirelessly to attain it – without blaming others or outside factors for the roadblocks they must overcome.

As I said Monday, your life is your story written by you. Own it. Be proud of it. If you’re not where you want to be, change it.

In the end, you’ll have earned the right to claim your role on your team.

Make today better than yesterday, but not as great as tomorrow!


Chris Errington is a husband, dad, writer, seeker of truth and fervent believer in the power of utilizing best practices to live a more balanced and enjoyable life. When I’m not rooting for the Steelers and West Virginia University or desperately attempting to grow grass in the front/back yards, I’m working my plan to live my ultimate goal – Writing remotely from the deck of a 32-foot sloop while sailing throughout the Caribbean. Getting my wife to agree is another matter entirely.

– Follow me at:

Tsu: www.tsu.co/Chrissports

Twitter: @Tribunewriter

LinkedIn: www.linkedin.com/pub/chris-errington/6/aa3/553/

Facebook: http://www.facebook.com/chris.errington.564

A Lesson For A Northern Aquaintance …

Decision blog photo

Spoke to a man in his late 50’s while walking through a store parking lot last week and, despite the randomness of the quick conversation, gained the impetus for today’s best life practice.

A native of Michigan, he made a quick comment regarding how much he enjoyed the sunny, 78-degree weather and that he’d miss it when his vacation ended in a few days. I quickly explained that I understood, but that this was typical of my winters.

What we said next to one another is a lesson we all must understand.

“Wow. You’re lucky to be able to live here year round,” the man said.

“Luck has nothing to do with it,” I explained. “Seven years ago I decided to live here and made it happen.”

And with that, I nodded and entered the grocery store. The reason for my quick departure? I wanted the lesson to be fully understood.

I’m not going to give you a rah-rah session to get you going this Monday morning. If you’ve read this blog since last August, you know we’re way beyond that.

But what I will provide is a best life practice that no matter your situation, no matter your age, no matter your beliefs, will always hold true.


“Life is a product of the decisions you make.”

Good or bad. Small or large. Quick or painstakingly thought-provoking. Each time you make a decision, you change the direction and outlook of your life.

If you find life is leading you to an undesireable outcome, make decisions to alter your course. If you believe you’re powerless to change, you’re not. But it’s a good bet it was a previous decision that put you in this predicament.

As long as we possess control over our lives, the choices we make are ours and, subsequently, determine our outcome. For the overwhelming majority of us, this is always the case.

So, no matter where you are, take ownership of your life. For better or worse, it’s the story you’ve written. The best part is, since the ending hasn’t occured, you’re always one decision away from changing it.

Make today better than yesterday, but not as great as tomorrow!


Chris Errington is a husband, dad, writer, seeker of truth and fervent believer in the power of utilizing best practices to live a more balanced and enjoyable life. When I’m not rooting for the Steelers and West Virginia University or desperately attempting to grow grass in the front/back yards, I’m working my plan to live my ultimate goal – Writing remotely from the deck of a 32-foot sloop while sailing throughout the Caribbean. Getting my wife to agree is another matter entirely.

– Follow me at:

Tsu: www.tsu.co/Chrissports

Twitter: @Tribunewriter

LinkedIn: www.linkedin.com/pub/chris-errington/6/aa3/553/

Facebook: http://www.facebook.com/chris.errington.564